Thailand's Showcase Forum

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Thailand's "Re:Search" Design Showcase Forum
on Tuesday, 3 July 2012
Venue: Mahachakri Sirindhorn Building

17.00-17.15 Wannasilpa Peerapun (Thailand) on "Participatory Planning in Urban Conservation and Regeneration of Amphawa Community"
17.15-17.30 Kasama Yamtree (Thailand)
on "Architecture of Mine, Yours and Ours"
17.30-17.45 Wan Sophonpanich (Thailand)
on "Disastrous Design for Disaster"
17.45-18.00 Saran Yen Panya (Thailand)
on "Design Thinking and Sustainable Culture"
18.00-18.05 Ezio Manzini (Italy)
DESIS Network Video
18.05-18.20 Panel Discussion with Ezio Manzini (Italy)
on "Using Design Thinking and Design Knowledge to Trigger, Enable and Scale-up Sustainable/Social Innovation in Thailand"
18.20-18.30 Open Discussion with the Audience
Keynote Lecture by Toshi Nakamura

Keynote Lecture by Toshi Nakamura
Venue: Mahachakri Sirindhorn Building

18.45 Panel Discussion with Toshi Nakamura (Japan)
Keynote Lecture on "Innovation with Impact"

Wannasilpa Peerapun

Wannasilpa Peerapun


"Participatory Planning in Urban Conservation and Regeneration of Amphawa Community"


Amphawa Community is a small municipality located in Samut Songkhram Province, about 18 kilometers from the estuary, and 80 kilometers west of Bangkok. The community has a long history as a water-based settlement dating back to Ayutthaya Period in the mid 17th century and was the birthplace of King Rama II. In the past, Amphawa was the biggest water-based commercial center in Samut Songkhram Province. The old water-based settlement of the community consists of more than 300 units of wooden and masonry shop-houses and individual dwellings lining along Amphawa Canal. By the end of the 20th century, with the advent of land transportation system, the community’s original economic importance began to fade out. Amphawa Community became a small community with its housing mostly in a state of dilapidation, some of which was uninhabited. Little attention was paid to building maintenance and rehabilitation, causing the overall heritage values of the community to decline. Most of the community residents were the elderly and children. Young and active people had migrated out of the area. Nonetheless, Amphawa still retained its identity as a water-based community with beautiful temples, traditional wooden houses, row-houses and tropical fruit farms.


Urban conservation and regeneration planning of Amphawa Community comprises a series of interrelated projects starting from 2000 until the present. Action research, a “learning by doing” approach, is utilized and various techniques of public participation are applied intensively throughout the planning process. “Amphawa Model,” the community conservation and regeneration model, has been gradually developed and refined to help direct all strategies and policies. Urban conservation and regeneration of Amphawa Community is very successful, making it an excellent case study for urban conservation and regeneration planning at the local level.


 

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Kasama Yamtree

Kasama Yamtree


"Architecture of Mine, Yours and Ours”


‘Architecture of mine, yours and ours…’ talks about the idea of the way architecture is changed by people over time – both short and long period of time. Underneath the changes, there are lots of positive and negative stories and learning which sometimes cannot be explained all, through a piece of architecture but are recorded inside the people.


‘Architecture of mine, yours and ours…’ is a series of conversations, argument, agreement and disagreement that were documented through the processes of working with people in the communities throughout Bangkok, which has affected the way the architecture looks and becomes meaningful or meaningless to different people at different times.


‘Architecture of mine, yours and ours…’ is about having a piece of architecture as an apparatus to create a space where people come, learn and pass on their knowledge and community culture…


 

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Wan Sophonpanich

Wan Sophonpanich


"Disastrous Design for Disaster"


Disasters often draw out the most basic impulses to create designs that will save the world.?They are seen as opportunities for designers to use their skills and abilities for the greater good.?Regrettably, this is commonly done without grounded research and clear understanding on what happens in a disaster, the stakeholders involved and their different dynamics at play. In shelter, the results often involve introduction of unfamiliar technologies, are too expensive, raise false expectations, don't follow established standards, or are simply inappropriate to local communities they were designed for.


This is not to say that design professionals have no roles to play within the humanitarian sector, for there are plenty of gaps still waiting to be filled. ?The questions are whether those queuing to fill these gaps are willing to do their homework in order to truly understand what is required, what already exists, and how they could creatively contribute to the process. And whether the humanitarian communities are able to set briefs that effectively utilise design professionals at their strongest potentials.


One of the key humanitarian principles is to 'do no harm'. A humbleness that designers often lack; though they would do well to take it to heart when working within disaster and development contexts. We must do all we can to ensure that the road to disastrous design is not paved with our good intentions.


 

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Saran Yen Panya

Saran Yen Panya


"Design Thinking and Sustainable Culture"


Saran Yen Panya’s viewpoint is a unique and distinctive way of ‘borrowing’ culture, traditions, custom and belief of run-of–the-mill and pedestrian Thais that are often scorned over, forgotten or used repeatedly they lost their values and put them in a new context that creates a new visual language. His novel method results in works that beg for questions. Most importantly, it breathes fresh air into ordinary things that have been overlooked. We could say with conviction that it a recycled of forgone culture.


Being brought up in a social culture filled with conflicting hierarchical divisions has mold Saran Yen Panya into a sharp reflect of ‘low income, high taste’ consumer culture. His visual language is both sarcastic and full of criticism. His best feature is his lack of boundary as he uses all kinds of media in his design. His message is instilled into everything from animation work, fashion, furniture to visual communication piece.


This year, he has been exhibiting his project “Cheap Ass Elites” in both Paris and Milan furniture Fairs. Cheap Ass Elites is a critique on what is considered “high” and “low” in both sociological aspects and design. This project rotates around working class aesthetics between rich and classical elements such as the Louis armchair, the ottoman chair and the styles of William Morris’s most commonly used theme set within a design context. The goal is to create subtle, yet ironic comments on this “normality.” The chairs sarcastically illustrate and question what society’s indoctrination is really built on


His Master Thesis, Early Morning Life is an animated film told through the eyes of a stuck-up middle class son about his parents’ poor childhood, their hidden ambitions and how they escaped from the harsh reality of life. Emphasizing the fact that “class strata” exists even in a family institution, the film’s visual style is taken from Day-Glo (neon) paintings that are commonly seen in souvenir shops and usually considered “low” art. Early Morning Life is a critique on modern Thai society where the gap between the rich and the poor is extremely vast. This results in everything from politics, lifestyle, and culture or even in a family institution.


 

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Ezio Manzini

Ezio Manzini


DESIS Network


(Special Forum via Teleconference)

Ezio Manzini is an Italian design strategist, one of the world’s leading experts on sustainable design, author of numerous design books, professor of Industrial Design at Milan Polytechnic, and founder of the DESIS (Design for Social Innovation towards Sustainability) network of university-based design labs. His work over the past 30 years in sustainability and social innovation has coalesced around four watchwords: small, local, open and connected.


Abstract


DESIS-Design for Social Innovation for Sustainability is a network of design labs based in design schools (or in other design-oriented universities) promoting social innovation towards sustainability.  It has been started in 2009 as a by-product of a research supported by the UNEP Task Force on Sustainable Lifestyles (CCSL-Creative Communities for Sustainable Life Styles). Since then, DESIS evolved in dimension and in quality and, now there are 25 DESIS Labs in Europe, North and America, Africa, Asia and Australia.  

 

This network nodes are the DESIS Labs: teams of professors, researchers and students who are orienting their didactic and research activities towards social innovation processes. Each Lab develops its projects using its resources and collaborates with other Labs to conceive and develop larger common projects. These DESIS Projects can be very diverse in terms of goals and strategies. Presently, there are three major on-going DESIS Projects. They are:

 

• Public&Collaborative: it is a cluster of 10 DESIS Labs in Europe and USA, aiming at exploring together how social innovation enhances the public sector. And vice versa.

 

• Philosophy Talks: it is a format conceived to discuss in depth relevant themes that design is facing when triggers and supports social innovation. The first Philosophy Talk has been held in February 2012, at Parsons school, in New York, on the topic “Emerging aesthetics”.

 

• Showcase: it is a format developed in partnership with the Cumulus Association, the goal of which is to give an overview on what design schools are doing in the field of design for social innovation. Operatively, the DESIS Showcases take place back-to-back with the Cumulus Conferences. The next one will be held in Chile, in November 2012).

 

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Toshi Nakamura

Toshi Nakamura


"Innovation with Impact"


Toshi is Co-founder and CEO of Kopernik, technology marketplace for the developing world. Toshi has extensive experience in international development gained during his career with the United Nations. He has spent the past 10 years living in East Timor, Indonesia, Sierra Leone, the United States and Switzerland working with the United Nations and dealt with governance reform, peace building processes and post-disaster reconstruction including the tsunami in Aceh and the Yogyakarta earthquake. While in Indonesia he engaged Japanese companies in pro-poor business development. Prior to joining the UN Toshihiro was a management consultant for McKinsey and Company in Tokyo. He holds an L.L.B from Kyoto University, Japan and Masters of Comparative Politics from the London School of Economics and Political Science, UK. Toshi is Guest Associate Professor at Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.


Abstract


Design innovation has been making our lives easier. However, most innovation is primarily targeting people in the developed world. What if the effort and creativity that goes into the innovation for the rich minority is shifted towards solving major issues for the majority in developing countries?


Kopernik, the technology marketplace for the developing world, curates and disseminates a wide selection of design technologies that are invented to solve issues that the poor faces, such as energy, environment, water, agriculture, health and education.


In his keynote speech, Toshi will share examples of designs for the developing world, and explain how these innovations are having an impact on poor people’s lives. Toshi will encourage the audience to put their creativity, talent and resources into providing solutions to underserved communities.


External Link

http://Kopernik.info

http://www.facebook.com/thekopernik


Twitter

@thekopernik (for Kopernik)

@toshikopernik (personal account)

 

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Welcome to DRS 2012